• Tips gratefully accepted here. Thanks!:

  • Recent Comments

    katiebird on Serial: Cold Turkey
    r u reddy on Ditto, Mr. Edsall
    Mr Mike on Happy Thanksgiving!
    Mr Mike on Happy Thanksgiving!
    Sweet Sue on Happy Thanksgiving!
    katiebird on Happy Thanksgiving!
    katiebird on Serial: Cold Turkey
    Sweet Sue on Happy Thanksgiving!
    riverdaughter on Serial: Cold Turkey
    katiebird on Serial: Cold Turkey
    riverdaughter on Serial: Cold Turkey
    riverdaughter on Serial: Cold Turkey
    katiebird on Serial: Cold Turkey
    katiebird on Serial: Cold Turkey
    riverdaughter on Happy Thanksgiving!
  • Categories


  • Tags

    abortion Add new tag Afghanistan Al Franken Anglachel Atrios bankers Barack Obama big pharma Bill Clinton Chris Christie cocktails Conflucians Say Dailykos Democratic Party Democrats Digby DNC Donna Brazile Economy Elizabeth Warren feminism Florida Fox News General Glenn Beck Glenn Greenwald Goldman Sachs health care Health Care Reform Hillary Clinton Howard Dean Joe Biden John Edwards John McCain Jon Corzine Karl Rove Keith Olbermann Matt Taibbi Media medicare Michelle Obama Michigan misogyny Mitt Romney Morning Edition Morning News Links Nancy Pelosi New Jersey news NO WE WON'T Obama Obamacare occupy wall street OccupyWallStreet Open thread Paul Krugman Politics Presidential Election 2008 PUMA racism Republicans Sarah Palin sexism Single Payer snark Social Security Supreme Court Terry Gross Texas Tim Geithner unemployment Wall Street WikiLeaks women
  • Archives

  • History

    July 2010
    S M T W T F S
    « Jun   Aug »
     123
    45678910
    11121314151617
    18192021222324
    25262728293031
  • RSS Paul Krugman: Conscience of a Liberal

  • The Confluence

    The Confluence

  • RSS Suburban Guerrilla

  • RSS Ian Welsh

    • Ferguson and the brokenness of America’s “Justice” System
      There isn’t much to say that others haven’t, but let’s go through it anyway: There was never any chance that Darren Wilson would be charged; the prosecutor acted as defense attorney, not as prosecutor; A grand jury, for all intents and purposes does what the prosecutor tells it to; Doing the announcement at 8pm at [...]
  • Top Posts

Sunday Bake Off

Good Day Conflucians!! In my corner of the Blue Ridge foothills we had a heat index of 105 yesterday, and we’re getting there today. There’s a heat index of 107 over in Richmond with heat related fires already happening. I’m starting to feel like the Salvador Dali’s Melting Clocks painting above. My weather radio just blasted out a heat advisory just before it melted. I’m thinking of trying the old egg on the sidewalk test. But first, let’s check some news.

The war in Afghanistan is expected to worsen:

More NATO troops will die in Afghanistan as violence mounts over the summer, but Washington’s goal of turning the tide against the insurgency by year’s end is within reach, the top U.S. military officer said on Sunday.

The remarks by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Admiral Mike Mullen, on a visit to the country, came as the Taliban said they were holding captive one of two U.S. servicemen who strayed into insurgent territory, and that the other had been killed.

It also comes less than a week since a major international conference in Kabul agreed that the Afghan government should aim to take responsibility for security in all parts of the country by 2014.

Mullen, who called the troops’ disappearance an “unusual circumstance”, said there would be more violent incidents to come, but the U.S. military was doing everything possible to find the missing men.

Violence in Afghanistan is at its highest of the 9-year war as thousands of extra U.S. troops, dispatched by President Barack Obama in December, step up their campaign to drive insurgents out of their traditional heartland in the south.

Last month was the deadliest for foreign troops since 2001, with more than 100 killed, and civilian deaths have also risen as ordinary Afghans are increasingly caught in the crossfire.

“As we continue our force levels and our operations over the summer … we will likely see further tough casualties and levels of violence,” Mullen told a news conference in Kabul.

We’ve heard rumors of this before, and the PR for it is obvious, so more news of BP’s CEO Tony Hayward stepping down comes as no surprise:

Tony Hayward’s departure from his job as BP’s chief executive will be at the center of the agenda when the company’s board of directors meets Monday night, according to a source close to the company.

The board is meeting in advance of Tuesday’s release of quarterly results, and the directors will weigh how best to confront or defuse criticism as the company unveils its best estimates of massive losses arising from the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Hayward, a geologist who has spent his entire career at BP, recognizes that he has become “a liability going forward” and is ready to step down, the source close to the company said. The source asked for anonymity because the company has not yet announced its intentions.

Your hippy dippy propaganda arm of the WH has an update on the gulf oil spill. Everything is grand of course, big concerts, all cleaned up, it’s all good. Here’s a bit I particularly liked:

As chief executive officer of America, Barack Obama has walked the factory floor when it comes to managing the federal response to the Gulf oil spill, going directly to front-line workers. He’s used wiles respected in the boardroom in wringing a $20 billion commitment from BP. But what was that talk about kicking butt? That’s so assembly line Ford Motor Co., circa 1930. And why on Earth did it take him so long to talk to BP’s chief? A real CEO would have had Tony Hayward on the phone in a New York minute. The president is not, of course, the head of a company. He’s accountable to the public in ways a chief executive is not to shareholders. Governance and politics differ from effective corporate management while sharing certain qualities.

The other, other most evil politician in the universe, Newt of course, will decide about running after the mid terms:

Republican former House of Representatives Speaker Newt Gingrich said Sunday that he will decide after November’s congressional elections whether to run for the White House in 2012.

Gingrich has openly explored entering the battle for the 2012 Republican nomination to challenge President Barack Obama, making recent visits to early battleground states Iowa and New Hampshire. Gingrich said he had been to 10 states in the last two weeks.

“I think that’s a decision we’ll make in February or March,” Gingrich said on “Fox News Sunday” of a presidential run. “This is a very hard family decision because it’s such a deep commitment, and it is so absorbing.”

What a piece of work. OK, that’s being kind. I think the Republican machine has already decided on Romney like the Dem machine decided on Reagan Bush Obama. But then again perhaps it’s still early.

European Banks went through the old stress test:

More than 100 banks in the US have now collapsed so far this year after another seven were taken over by regulators late on Friday – the same day that seven European banks failed a financial health check.

With rising bad debts tied to commercial and residential mortgages, the number of US bank failures this year is expected to exceed last year’s figure of 140. The largest of the seven US banks just seized by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation – which acts as a receiver and protects depositors – was Crescent Bank and Trust Company in Georgia, with more than $1bn in assets. In all, the seven failed banks had total assets of $2bn.

In Europe, investors will have a first real chance tomorrow to react to the results of banking stress tests designed to ease concerns about institutions’ financial strength and exposure to debt-laden countries such as Greece.

Regulators assessed how banks would stand up to a double dip recession and a sovereign debt crisis. But several analysts questioned whether the tests were tough enough, since, for example, banks were only required to simulate losses on sovereign debt held for trading purposes and not on bonds they might hold to maturity.

Five of the seven institutions that failed the tests were Spanish cajas, or regional savings banks, with Greece’s ATE and Germany’s Hypo Real Estate being the other two.

And of course in other good news, Iran is putting some threats out there because the EU gave them more sanctions:

Iran has told the EU it will “regret” imposing its toughest economic sanctions yet to force Tehran to halt uranium enrichment and return to negotiations about its nuclear programme.

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran’s president, promised today that the Islamic republic would “respond strongly to any threat” hours before EU foreign ministers were to meet in Brussels to approve the sanctions. EU officials and independent analysts have described the sanctions as the “toughest ever” against any country, going beyond what was agreed by the UN security council last month.

The measure that will alarm Iran is the EU’s ban on new investment, technical assistance and technology transfers to its gas and oil industry, particularly for refining and liquefied natural gas. Iran is the world’s fourth largest producer of crude oil but imports 40% of its fuel because it lacks sufficient refining capacity.

“Anyone who adopts a measure against the Iranian nation … should know that Iran will react swiftly,” Ahmadinejad was quoted as saying by Press TV, Iran’s English-language TV channel. “Experience shows such a reaction by the Iranian nation will cause you to regret it.”

Thomas Friedman who I normally disagree with, has an interesting article on the Dems (and everyone’s) failure to pass some sort of cap and trade bill:

We’ve basically decided to keep pumping greenhouse gases into Mother Nature’s operating system and take our chances that the results will be benign — even though a vast majority of scientists warn that this will not be so. Fasten your seat belts. As the environmentalist Rob Watson likes to say: “Mother Nature is just chemistry, biology and physics. That’s all she is.” You cannot sweet-talk her. You cannot spin her. You cannot tell her that the oil companies say climate change is a hoax. No, Mother Nature is going to do whatever chemistry, biology and physics dictate, and “Mother Nature always bats last, and she always bats 1.000,” says Watson. Do not mess with Mother Nature. But that is just what we’re doing.

Since I don’t have anything else to say, I will just fill out this column with a few news stories and e-mails that came across my desk in the past few days:

Just as the U.S. Senate was abandoning plans for a U.S. cap-and-trade system, this article ran in The China Daily: “BEIJING — The country is set to begin domestic carbon trading programs during its 12th Five-Year Plan period (2011-2015) to help it meet its 2020 carbon intensity target. The decision was made at a closed-door meeting chaired by Xie Zhenhua, deputy director of the National Development and Reform Commission … Putting a price on carbon is a crucial step for the country to employ the market to reduce its carbon emissions and genuinely shift to a low-carbon economy, industry analysts said.”

As we East Coasters know, it’s been extremely hot here this summer, with records broken. But, hey, you could be living in Russia, where ABC News recently reported that a “heat wave, which has lasted for weeks, has Russia suffering its worst drought in 130 years. In some parts of the country, temperatures have reached 105 degrees.” Moscow’s high the other day was 93 degrees. The average temperature in July for the city is 76 degrees. The BBC reported that to keep cool “at lakes and rivers around Moscow, groups of revelers can be seen knocking back vodka and then plunging into the water. The result is predictable — 233 people have drowned in the last week alone.”

A day before the climate bill went down, Lew Hay, the C.E.O. of NextEra Energy, which owns Florida Power & Light, one of the nation’s biggest utilities, e-mailed to say that if the Senate would set a price on carbon and requirements for renewal energy, utilities like his would have the price certainty they need to make the big next-generation investments, including nuclear. “If we invest an additional $3 billion a year or so on clean energy, that’s roughly 50,000 jobs over the next five years,” said Hay. (Say goodbye to that.)

There’s a lot more there.

Crazy Dowd has the results of her latest drinking binge, that is just too good to pass up. She’s saying the Obama WH is too white:

The Obama White House is too white.

It has Barack Obama, raised in the Hawaiian hood and Indonesia, and Valerie Jarrett, who spent her early years in Iran.

But unlike Bill Clinton, who never needed help fathoming Southern black culture, Obama lacks advisers who are descended from the central African-American experience, ones who understand “the slave thing,” as a top black Democrat dryly puts it.

The first black president should expand beyond his campaign security blanket, the smug cordon of overprotective white guys surrounding him — a long political tradition underscored by Geraldine Ferraro in 1984 when she complained about the “smart-ass white boys” from Walter Mondale’s campaign who tried to boss her around.

Otherwise, this administration will keep tripping over race rather than inspiring on race.

I’ll have what she’s drinking.

OK, there are a few items. I’d collect more but I’m starting to melt. Pile it on with what you’re finding along with your thoughts.

About these ads

103 Responses

  1. Heh, heh – MoDo’s article is actually less demented than her usual fare.
    Occasionally she even makes sense

    he feels that he and Michelle are such a huge change for the nation to absorb that he can be overly cautious about pushing for other societal changes for blacks and gays. At some level, he acts like the election was enough; he shouldn’t have to deal with race further. But he does.

    • That’s race versus class. The Obamas do a bang-up job representing the interests or wealthy African American. They also do pretty well with rich whites. I think there’s a pattern there.

  2. Thanks for the roundup, Dandy

    The GOP slate is so ridiculous, Newt, Mitt… they’re both four letter words too.

    • I think if Newt is the chosen boy for the GOP…then I will be turning my living room into a padded cell, with lots of chocolate stashed under the sofa cushions and a vuvuzela to drown out his big mouth…I am sorry, Newt has always annoyed me.

  3. Thanks, Dandy – it’s currently the index here is 96 we are also in the midst of a terrific downpour – but the Gold finches outside my office sliders are just hanging in there filling their little tummies with Nijer seeds.

    Hmmm – hubby and I have reservations to celebrate our 46th Anniversary this evening – hope the rain slows down and cools things off a bit. :?

  4. great post,thank you!

    Tony Hayward’s departure from his job as BP’s chief executive will be at the center of the agenda when the company’s board of directors meets Monday night, according to a source close to the company.

    It’s a Mcchrystal move…it’s suppose to mean change , but that’s a lie. It’s about bringing down heat on themselves ( “let the new guy get his barrings ” is what they will say for months instead of answering a damn question ) while doing nothing . And when the heat comes back up, they will remove whoever they put in with another new guy who “needs time ” to get his barrings…then they might make another panel , who needs time and let’s wait to see what the panel of has-been water carriers hacks say before answering your question …blah blah blah on and on
    while doing nothing

    • Agreed. What is his golden parachute?

    • A few days ago I saw that announcement on the bottom ticker tape on my TV. It was either MSNBC or CNN. I thought it was strange that it would be announced this way. Then I hear all about it this weekend as though it was something new. I think it is meaningless just as those goofy ads from BP are meaningless. In each one a different guy says he’s in charge of the clean up. He’s always some local guy that is the face of Louisiana. They seem to want to put any normal “Joe” as the face of BP as opposed to the wealthy CEO.

  5. But unlike Bill Clinton, who never needed help fathoming Southern black culture, Obama lacks advisers who are descended from the central African-American experience, ones who understand “the slave thing,” as a top black Democrat dryly puts it.

    I always maintained that’s one of the reasons why Obama went to Wright’s church…to learn and use the general African-American experience on his way up the political food chain . Why would he think he need it now? Because speaking of ” the slave thing,” BO think he owns them.

    • Bobby Rush spanked Obama in the 2000 primary by arguing that he wasn’t black enough.

      • …and why the upper crust warmed to him. The last thing they would want in the WH is someone who actually gives a hoot about the AA…or gays women the poor or any of the rabble…( us) Obama’s mentality is that of owner…and without empathy…But he looks the ticket! That is all that was required.

  6. Yes, it is a scorcher here in the Richmond area. I’m not looking forward to my electric bill for this month.

  7. I got some bad news for the Mittster – the fundigelicals ain’t gonna vote for no Mormon.

    I was raised in a fundie church and for reasons I never quite understood they hate Mormons worse than Muslims, Buddhists and all them other Devil worshiping cultists.

    • I agree, he’s got a problem. Then again, so did Obama. Sometimes the machine does what it wants to do though.

      It’s always tough to discern why one batshit crazy group dislikes another batshit crazy group. :-)

      • Obama didn’t have to worry about racists in the Democratic base, despite what his followers think.

        The fundies won’t vote for a Mormon, and the conservatives don’t trust him. That’s over 2/3 of the GOP base. How is he gonna win the nomination?

        • Well, the elites could get Lipstick to run and then Mitt or whichever other turkey could coast on a misogynist and classist wave to the nomination.

          • If they run with Mitt Romney, they will be very sorry.

          • BB,

            I think that Mitt would be a better General Election candidate. I just don’t think he comes out of the Republican primaries.

            OTOH, Palin and Huckabee could easily win the Republican primaries but I see them as much weaker GE candidates.

          • 2012 will be a referendum on Obama. If he’s doing good, it won’t really matter who the Republicans run.

            If he’s still tanking, it really won’t matter who the Republicans run.

          • Hey, why don’t the Republicans get Scott “actual swimsuit model” Brown to run? He’ll have been in the Senate about as long as Obama was and he’s easy on the eyes. He and Palin could tag team and take the country by storm. I wouldn’t vote for them but I could see them both being very successful.
            Here’s your new libertarian/socially moderate Republican president:
            President Scott Brown

          • If he’s still tanking, it really won’t matter who the Republicans run.

            Electoral politics are strange.

            Sometimes the incumbent is bound to lose unless the opposition nominates one of the very few candidates who could lose to said incumbent. NV is a prime example.

            I don’t think Palin, Huckabee or even Newt can win the GE. They are stars among their base but they just don’t have a broad appeal.

            If thinks stayed the way they are now, pretty much every R would win the GE.

          • myiq is generally correct and I think so in this case.

          • I don’t think Palin, Huckabee or even Newt can win the GE

            They said the same thing about Reagan. Carter thought he would have an easy time painting Ronnie as an extremist nutball.

            Reagan went “Aw shucks” and “There you go again” and Carter got to build houses for poor people.

          • RD,

            Good point and Mr. Centerfold is just as qualified!

            You made my day RD…cuz when I do it (point out the nakked Senator) someone tells spammy. ;-)

        • Obama didn’t have to worry about racists in the Democratic base, despite what his followers think.

          ABSOLUTELY!!!

          I used to tell ALL my White friends who were supporting Obama during the primaries that being Black was actually an advantage for him with the Democratic base, and I still believe that.

        • How is he gonna win the nomination?

          lol! cause of the rest of the field?. If the likes of Fred Thomas and Newt out…Romeny could do pretty well… He’ll be ham string for the general though if 2/3 of the GOP won’t vote for him. So perhaps the upper crust is planning on Obama’s 2nd term? If the GOP slime machine doesn’t pop into gear for Milt, then you know that’s what’s up. They can further destroy the new deal with greater ease if Barry is still there. We say, that can’t be! Yet Bush got installed again….

      • myiq,

        you seem to overlook Reagan’s quite impressive witticism, something Palin and Newt lack, and the fact that Huckabee could easily scare the general population in some large States.

        I really see many other Rs with much much better chances in the GE. Remember that Bush managed to win a 2nd term maybe because we chose the wrong guy, just like Reaid will stays in the Senate because R in NV chose the only person who could lose to him.

        • I’ve been following Newt’s career since before he was Speaker of the House. He’s the master of the soundbyte.

          Sarah ain’t no dummy neither. And after G-dubya there ain’t no such thing as “too stupid” to be President.

          All Sarah needs is money and a top campaign manager. She’s raising the money.

          • I don’t think Sarah is a dummy but I’ve noticed that she doesn’t respond well under pressure. Wait until she gets out of twitter, FB , Fox News, which she would have to do.
            Her fundraising prowess makes the news although it’s not great. She just raised 800K and it made all the news. However, many pols raised up to 5x as much in the same amount of time.

            Newt cannot have a broader appeal. He just cannot overcome his baggage to become POTUS. And he’s just vile, although he’s much more accepted by the R establishment.

          • Dealing with pressure takes practice. She’s getting it now. She doesn’t need money for the GOP primaries, she’s got the voters.

          • I think a good showing of that was seen both in her initial VP announcement speech and in the VP debates. In the speech, the teleprompter was off and/or the speech was changing real time, and she still nailed it. In the VP debate she won.

            However, during the campaign she then melted down with the Couric interview and a couple other places. She clearly was not up on a reasonable breadth and certainly not depth of issues outside of her immediate experience as governor. So for that she failed.

            I think in the general public, there is a pretty big number that doesn’t think well of her and would need to be convinced. That can be an uphill battle. So for the GE, that’s a pretty open question to how well she’d do.

            For the GOP primaries, I think she could pretty easily win if the machine allowed that to happen. I don’t think they will.

          • Sarah won the governorship by out-debating the good old boys and she more than held her own against Biden.

            She obviously never had a hostile interview like the ones Gibson and Couric gave her, but nobody ever gave Obama the third degree either.

            That’s usually the only kind of interview Hillary gets.

            Al Gore ran laps around G-Dubya but the press declared Bush the winner because he didn’t shit on himself.

          • Well she will have to get Levi under control. The moral majority can’t like the Bravo show I saw this weekend with Kathy (Oh, so disgusting) Griffin. I can’t believe what a dumb shit Levi is to have been following Kathy around like a trained dog!

    • It’s the holy underwear and the secret handshakes.

  8. “I think that’s a decision we’ll make in February or March,” Gingrich said on “Fox News Sunday” of a presidential run. “This is a very hard family decision because it’s such a deep commitment, and it is so absorbing.”

    I wonder which of his three families ol’ Newtron is talking about. Come to think if it, he’ll probably have a fourth by then.

  9. I thought Dowd was making sense today too. I posted this section on the previous thread.

    Charles Sherrod, Shirley’s husband, was a Freedom Rider who, along with the civil rights hero John Lewis, was a key member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee of the ‘60s.

    As Lewis, the longtime Georgia congressman, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, he knew immediately that something was amiss with the distorted video clip of Sherrod talking to the N.A.A.C.P.

    “I’ve known these two individuals — the husband for more than 50 years and the wife for at least 35, 40 — and there’s not a racist hair on their heads or anyplace else on their bodies,” Lewis said.

    We may not have a “nation of cowards” on race, as Attorney General Eric Holder contended, but we may have a West Wing of cowards on race.

    No one else in the media has called attention to Shirley’s husband being a civil rights movement leader.

    • Joan Walsh had a great article about him:

      The civil rights heroism of Charles Sherrod

      Sherrod was SNCC’s first field secretary, and he co-founded the Albany movement after a student sit-in at the local bus station (to test a recently enacted desegregation law) led to a years-long campaign that ultimately involved Martin Luther King Jr. and the intervention of President John F. Kennedy. He traveled to the historic (and almost all-white) 1964 Democratic National Convention, when the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party fought for more black representation. He was jailed several times and stayed with SNCC until 1966, when Stokely Carmichael became chair and whites were expelled, but he’d already become more focused on his work in southwest Georgia than SNCC politics. Sherrod got his doctor of divinity degree from New York’s Union Theological Seminary, then returned to Albany to found the Southwest Georgia Independent Voters Project, then the agricultural cooperative New Communities Inc. He served 14 years on the Albany City Council, and he still lives there, known to civil rights movement veterans but obscure to the wider world, until his wife was attacked by the ignorant bullies of the right.

      It’s really worth a read.

      • And I bet Obama thought they were just canning some insignificant little old lady who works with down and out farmers….

        Oh, and that piece of soporific pablum about B0 as CEO of America, walking the factory floors and wielding his magical wiles—-GAG ME!!!

    • Wiki has her backstory. Dowd is right on one thing, he is out of touch when it comes to post Civil Rights era people, here. LOL! But we knew that all along. I was reading BAR circa 2008. Just to see.

      Dandy 107 degrees? Whew. Climate Change, no? It must be.
      Listening to the news right now and it’s cooler here than in Seattle.
      Hmmm…..

      stay cool!

    • Not to downplay the involvment of Charles Sherrod in the civil rights movement. But the SNCC was pretty much the same as the Tea Party……….early they really didn’t have organization, they couldn’t account for or monitor the protesters. People didn’t know what was happening, and who was involved early on. That is why I compare it to the Tea party who also started out as movement and not an organization.

      There was not just one leader in SNCC, but many, kinda like the tea parties structure.

  10. This is so weird. I am sure I read the same story a few years back. It even involved the University of Evansville, I think.

    http://www.aolnews.com/health/article/abby-guerra-reported-dead-in-crash-discovered-to-be-alive-in-hospital/19567634

  11. Listening to news regarding Korea. Ummm….

    YIKES.

    hugs Conf and Co.

  12. Thought I would post this one I found today:

    “Witnessing the two parties go after each other is like watching the worst teams in a football conference playing for last place. All the players are talentless, unskilled, inept, and down right scary – someone is going to get injured. ”

    http://johnwsmart.blogspot.com/2010/07/this-week-in-politics.html

  13. Has anyone else seen this?

    http://blog.aflcio.org/2010/07/24/trumka-at-netroots-nation-new-industrial-policy-for-a-globalized-world/

    I probably won’t since dial up turns 6 min into forever, but I thought the aspect of them still working together on a plan was interesting.

    Unions put big chunks of money into Obama last time. I was curious how this plan might come together.

  14. Afghanistan war logs: Massive leak of secret files exposes truth of occupation

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jul/25/afghanistan-war-logs-military-leaks

    There’s a ton of information here at the Guardian based on Wikileaks files.

    • The First Cheating Couple, that served his wife divorce papers at the hospital when she was fighting cancer? If he could betray his wife with a staff member, he wouldn’t hesitate to sell us out too.

      • Obama won’t cheat on Michelle. She would snap him in two with her toned arms.

        • She probably wouldn’t care, less time being forced to listen to him pontificate. OTOH, if he gets caught he’ll want to turn it into a “teachable moment.”

        • I don’t think he could get motivated to cheat. He seems totally asexual.

          • I know!! When everyone was making a big deal about his “crotch shot” to the reporters on his campaign plane and I saw the film, I was like “oh, yawn, those reporters are way too easy.”

          • I know! When everyone was fussing over his “crotch shot” to the reporters on his campaign plane, and I saw the clip, I was like, “oh, yawn, those reporters are way to easy.”

  15. Best and the Brightest Redux

    WHEN AUTHOR David Halberstam wrote his account of what got this nation into Vietnam, he didn’t find that the architects of the war were obtuse or illogical or commie-obsessed or infatuated with American might. Instead, in Halberstam’s now iconic term that became the title of his best-selling book, they were “the best and the brightest’’ — a superior governing class that was the product of America’s best families, its most prestigious prep schools and universities, and most august law firms and investment banks. The irony is that these geniuses turned out to be so dangerously wrong that the very term “best and the brightest’’ became a sarcastic euphemism for a hubris that leads to disaster.

    One might have thought, then, that the “best and the brightest’’ would have been eternally discredited like the war they promulgated. But Barack Obama has such a strange, almost reverential faith in the very sorts of folks Halberstam flayed that the president threatens to lead his administration and the country down the same hubristic path.

    • Whoa!

      • This blew me away because it matches so well with what I think we see coming out of DC now.

        So what difference does it make if our policy-makers think they are above criticism? As Halberstam shows in “The Best and the Brightest,’’ people who are concerned not with the fundamental rightness of something but with its execution, because the rightness is assumed; people who see what they want to see rather than what is; people who see things in terms of preconceptions rather than of human conduct; people who are incapable of admitting error; people who lack skepticism and the capacity to grow beyond their certainties are the sorts of people who are likely to get us in trouble — whether it is an ever-lengthening war in Afghanistan or ever-deepening economic distress here at home. After all, we’ve been there once before.

      • So what difference does it make if our policy-makers think they are above criticism? As Halberstam shows in “The Best and the Brightest,’’ people who are concerned not with the fundamental rightness of something but with its execution, because the rightness is assumed; people who see what they want to see rather than what is; people who see things in terms of preconceptions rather than of human conduct; people who are incapable of admitting error; people who lack skepticism and the capacity to grow beyond their certainties are the sorts of people who are likely to get us in trouble — whether it is an ever-lengthening war in Afghanistan or ever-deepening economic distress here at home. After all, we’ve been there once before.

        That’s a perfect description of Chris Bowers’ “creative class.” Anyone who doesn’t agree with them is a racist or a “low-information voter (or both.)

        • and how is that different from the Republican screed that any one who doesn’t agree with them is a communist or some kind of cultural elite?

          Why all this personality destruction?

          • Because you’re not worthy.

          • given all that context, that’s a compliment to me!

          • Yes it is.

          • Because they’re not qualified to do anything and can’t possibly hold on to power without ginning up resentment and creating this in-group out-group mentality. Sadly for the CCers, though, the VIP section is empty, they’ve created a club nobody wants to join.

          • Because it’s easier than making a cogent argument.

          • Because they’re not qualified to do anything and can’t possibly hold on to power without ginning up resentment and creating this in-group out-group mentality.

            They hate anyone who doesn’t recognize their superiority. It’s an elitist thing.

            They sure do hate a lot of people though, don’t they?

          • I swear that the only thing separating the CCers and the Repubs is the high school hierarchy. They spent 4 years picking on each other and can’t get past those scars to see that they go together like Rama lama lama ka ding-a-la ding along.

Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 471 other followers

%d bloggers like this: