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    • The Rule of Alienation and Stability
      One of my favourite sights is to see people complaining that marginalized people don’t understand that their support for Bad Politician-X results in fucking themselves. “Sure,” runs the line, “their lives suck now. But they’ll suck even worse if this guy gets into power.” This is often (but not always) true. It is also irrelevant. […]
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We have an answer

There’s an old joke concerning a gentleman and an actress at a dinner party at a posh English manor. It goes something like this:

In a game of hypothetical questions, the gentleman asked the lady, “Would you sleep with a stranger if he paid you a million pounds?”

“Yes,” she answered.

“And if he paid you five pounds?”

The irate lady fumed, “What kind of woman do you think I am?”

“We’ve already established that,” returned the gentleman. “Now we’re just haggling over the price.”

Those of us who did not vote for Trump, looked forward to his inauguration with dread and have watched every day of his administration with disgust and horror, finally might have an answer to what it will take for Trump voters to realize that we’re not just unreasonably angry and that there really is something extraordinarily abnormal about Trump and his family.

Dana Milbank at WaPo explains:

For nearly three years, Republican lawmakers have stood with Trump, offering only isolated protest, through all manner of outrage. Disparaging Mexican immigrants. Videotaped boasts about sexually assaulting women. Alleging that his predecessor put a wiretap on him. Falsely claiming mass­ive voter fraud. Racism directed at a federal judge. The firing of James B. Comey. Talk of women bleeding. A payoff to a porn actress over an alleged affair. A defense of white supremacists in Charlottesville. Support for Senate candidate Roy Moore despite allegations of child molestation. The guilty pleas of Michael Flynn, George Papadopoulos and Rick Gates and the indictment of Paul Manafort. The botched travel ban and bungled repeal of Obamacare. Insulting Britain and other allies. Attacks on the FBI and judiciary and attempts to fire the attorney general. Talk of African “shithole” countries. Questions about his mental stability. The lethargic hurricane response in Puerto Rico. The stream of staff firings and resignations and personal and ethical scandals, most recently Tuesday’s finding that Kellyanne Conway twice violated the Hatch Act.

Republican lawmakers were, by and large, okay with all that. But now Trump has at last gone too far. He has proposed tariffs on foreign steel and aluminum. And the Republican Party is in an all-out revolt.

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (Wis.) fielded four questions at a news conference Tuesday morning and answered the same way four times: with a warning about the “unintended consequences” of Trump’s proposed tariffs.

That, oh best beloveds, is where they draw the line. You can do whatever you want as long as you don’t cause “unintended consequences” in the market. And with the resignation of Gary Cohn, Trump has signaled that he either does not know what he’s doing with tariffs or he doesn’t listen to his top economic advisor. Trump is fully committed to exploiting any populist frenzy and use the power of his presidency to aid his family’s business. If the country starts resembling Haiti under Baby Doc Duvalier and his fashion loving wife Michelle, what does he care?

But if the market gives way at the prospect of relentless trade wars and no sensible person manning the ship going into an election year when Republican voters might notice the hit to their 401k’s? That’s a bridge too far.

That’s real money that affects the corporate overlords’ pockets and makes that paltry middle class tax cut the equivalent of money on the dresser.

That money was the payoff for the Trump voter to look the other way when Trump screwed over poor people, Black people, sick children, DACA people, gunned down teenagers, Muslims, the elderly on Medicare and Medicaid and on and on and on. But now it might all vanish with the opening bell.

The Trump voter might wake up to ask, “what kind of woman do you think I am??”

We’re about to find out.

*******************************

Sorry I missed this last night. Soledad O’Brien alerted Chris Cilizza to the vacuousness of his writing:

Oh snap! That’s going to leave marks.

Click the tweet to read the whole thread.

********************************

I love PA Gov Tom Wolf:

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