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Why don’t more women ask the Democrats “What’s in it for us?”

Melissa McKewn at Shakesville wrote a brilliant post four years ago that is even more relevant today.  At the time, the Clintonistas and other deeply concerned feminists were troubled by the use of misogyny by both political parties but particularly the Democrats and even more particularly, the Obama campaign.  Oh, you thought it was only the PUMAs that got poo flung at them?  No, indeedy.  It was any woman that had the temerity to speak up.  Anyone who threatened to harsh Obama’s mellow was accused of being traitors, whiners, insignificant, stupid, and bringing catastrophe on the whole country.

We’re going through the same thing again this year.  The past four years have been a disaster for women.  It hasn’t been Christmas and Easter and New Years for women under this version of Democrats.  It’s been more like Halloween.  If you weren’t paying attention last time to the myriad ways that Obama bowed and scraped at the feet of evangelicals to get their votes, then the Bart Stupak amendment might have been your wake up call.  Or maybe it was the retention of the Bush Administration’s conscience rule.  Or maybe Rick Warren’s sexist, homophobic version of prosperity based Christianity pissed you off during the inauguration.  Whatever it was, you figured out you had been screwed after it was too late to do anything about it.

But now that you know, what are your options going forward?  Well, read Melissa’s post from four years ago that she republished a couple of days ago.  It’s basically the same thing I’ve been saying for four years.  You have the option to walk away.  Also, Roe is dead, ladies.  We didn’t fight for equality first and now, we’re back to the pre-Roe days where states could make their own rules.  Pretty soon, abortions will only be available in a handful of coastal states, just like it was in the years immediately preceding Roe.  And there are already 5 votes on the Supreme Court to overturn Roe.  Kennedy will vote to eliminate it when the time comes.  So, there is really no compelling reason to pay any attention to the Democrats’ argument about Roe and the court.  They might get more traction if they focused on the rights of workers or inequality in general or voting rights but, you know, that’s just not this version of the Democratic party’s thing.

One thing is for sure: if you don’t wring some concessions and explicit promises and sincere preliminary steps from the Democrats, and Obama in particular, BEFORE the election, you’re sure as hell going to get the shaft afterwards because the Democrats’ concern with your welfare extends only as far as getting your vote.  Once they have that and get the power they want, you’re history to them.  Don’t make it so easy.

Oh, sure, the party will start to incite panic.  “What are you dooooooing?!?  Don’t you know that there is an election this year?  Why are you bringing up your rights now?  You’re being selfish, stupid, old, unpleasant, unattractive.  You’re collaborating with the Republicans, you’re a Tea Partier, you like that dunce Sarah Palin.  If we don’t win it will be all your fault.”  That is a guilt trip, my friends.  That’s the sound of people who suddenly realize that the urgency on their part does not constitute an emergency on yours.  Oh my god! You might actually *believe* in that stuff about bodily autonomy and agency and complete equality under the law.  It will be very inconvenient for them to stop what they are doing to either pacify you or cater to you.  I recommend that you make the Democrats kiss your asses.  Forget about Republicans.  They’re a lost cause.

Here’s how Melissa puts it (but go read the whole thing):

Forward movement for women can happen even in dictatorships, and can be reversed even in democracies—because women’s equality is inextricably linked to so many other cultural variables, like religiosity. To presume that greater democracy will de facto mean increased equality for women is to tacitly buy into Bush’s line about freedom magically emanating from any country deemed a functional democracy. It just doesn’t work that way. A democratically-elected conservative American theocracy would, for example, be anathema to feminism/womanism.

I have many good and important and personal reasons for not wanting the US to become any less democratic than it is now—not least of which is because those agitating for increased authoritarian control of government are simultaneously agitating for increased control of women’s bodies. I also have many good and important and personal reasons for fighting for my equality. Some of those good and important and personal reasons overlap. Some of them don’t. 

The important point here is that, while most USian FWs are undoubtedly interested in voting for the most democratic candidate, it is wrong to reflexively conflate “more democratic” with “more feminist” (even though that’s historically a safe bet). FWs may, in fact, for reasons outlines above, have to votecounter to feminist/womanist principles to vote for the most democratic candidate of the two major parties. That is not a small thing, and it should not be treated as though it is.

I would remind Democrats that what happened to Jon Corzine in NJ could very well happen to Obama.  Corzine as a governor was meh.  He did nothing to reform the highly regressive property tax system here.  He conducted a study and basically threw up his hands and said, “Well, what do you want me to do about it?”  Then he gave away our delegate votes to Obama at the convention.  Um, Obama didn’t win NJ.  Not even close.  Hillary won it by 10 points.  In general, Corzine looked like a Wall Street banker and governed pretty much the same way.  Democrats here are still smarting from his loss to Chris Christie.  It really shouldn’t come as a surprise though.  NJ has a history of electing Republican governors.  But that election should have been Corzine’s because, let’s face it, Christie isn’t a moderate Republican that would suit New Jersey’s tastes otherwise.  He’s  kind of crude, loud, a bully, a sexist asshole and definitely out to please his rich friends.  There’s no expectation that he will reform the property tax system, only that he will strangle local governments from growing.  And voters knew that going in.  He’s been a disaster for New Jersey.

But Corzine lost anyway even though he was the favored Democrat in 2009 in a year when Democrats should have had an easy run.  The local Democrats think it was a Christie revolution.  I disagree.  There was a third party candidate on the ballot that year.  His name was Chris Daggett, an independent, and judging from his debate performances, one of which I was able to attend in person, he was the best candidate we had.  Of course, the two major parties have a strangle hold on the ballots and every ballot in every county is different, so Daggett’s name wasn’t easy to locate.  You want to know how it turned out.  Here are the results?

Candidate Chris Christie Jon Corzine Chris Daggett
Party Republican Democratic Independent
Running mate Kim Guadagno Loretta Weinberg Frank Esposito
Popular vote 1,174,445 1,087,731 139,579
Percentage 48.5% 44.9% 5.8%

You’d think the Democrats would have learned their lesson but apparently they haven’t.  It doesn’t take much of a defection to flip a race to your opponent.  And right now, there are a lot of women who are angry enough at the passivity of the Democrats and their arrogant attitude towards the voters that it might be better for US to take our votes elsewhere or split our ticket or not vote at all.

So, you gotta ask yourselves, Democrats, will November 6, 2012 be your lucky day?


The Supernanny Inspired Guide to Politics: Vote for Daggett

Voters’ Meeting

I have spent some time observing your country, taken a look around.  First, I’d like to say that you are the owners of a wonderful country.  It is bright, vibrant, diverse.  It has a lot of potential.

However…

You are letting your politicians walk all over you.  They ignore you when you tell them what to do.  They laugh at you when you express your displeasure.  They hang around with people who you have forbidden them to talk to.  They behave as if your vote doesn’t count.  And you let them get away with it.  When they scream and cry for money, you give it to them.  When they accuse you of being “old, stupid, reactionary, Republican, racist, terrorists”, you vote for them anyway.  And in all that time, they have made only half-hearted efforts to clean up the environment and make the tax system more fair.  They think you’re not serious about health care reform, financial regulation and giving you the best educational system in the world.  They fight- *constantly*- with each other and other countries.

And they will continue to do this because they think you are total pushovers.  You have not enforced any discipline in your politicians.  You let them get away with everything.  If you want your country and control back, something’s got to change.  You have to be willing to step up and make some changes.  Are you ready to roll up your sleeves and put this country back in order?

Step One: Laying down the rules

The first thing we need to do is tell the politicians what we want and then deliver that message clearly and unambiguously.  If politicians aren’t delivering the results you want, it could be because you are sending them mixed messages.  You need to establish what kind of government you want and then stick with it.  You have to figure out what you value and put it into  words.  Your politicians’ noisy friends will try to distract you whilst you are thinking about this.  So, I recommend you shut the TV off whilst you are composing your set of rules based on your beliefs.  You can use our credo as an example

Second, deliver these values and rules to your politician.  Your politician now has no excuse for ignoring you.  You have told him/her what you expect and there should be no confusion about it from this point forward.

Step Two: Discipline

This step will require a committment from you because it will take some time before your politician gets it.

If your politician is not following your rules and living up to your values, you should immediately issue them a warning.  Call your politician’s or party’s office or meet them in person.  Use your authoritative voice and say, “I don’t like what you’re doing.  If you do not stop, I will put you in the Naughty Spot for your next term of office.”  If your politician does not comply, put him/her in the Naughty Spot.  For a Congressman, this is two years; for a Senator, six years; for a Governor, four years, etc.

When the politician attempts to get out of the Naughty Spot, calmly put them back on the Spot.  Do not attempt to argue with them if they make a fuss.  Simply repeat the reasons why you have taken the steps you are taking: They knew the rules.  They made an infraction.  You warned them.  They are being disciplined.  If they want off the Naughty Spot, they have agree to listen to you and to apologize to you.

In order for this to work, the Voter has to present a united front with other voters.  You have to have the courage to enforce the rule.  This is your responsibility as citizens.  You can’t run away from your responsibilities and expect that someone else is going to keep your politicians in line or that they will do it themselves.  They need your guidance and committment and they will comply much more quickly when they see you mean business and that voters are backing each other up.

This will not be easy.  It will take time and persistence.  You will feel like you’re not getting anywhere for awhile.  But stick with it.  Throwing a few of them on the Naughty Spot will focus their attention more effectively than you think.  Before you know it, they will be much more cooperative and life more harmonious with your values.

Here is your first opportunity, voters of New Jersey.  Neither Chris Christie or Jon Corzine has behaved in a manner worthy of your vote.  They both represent parties that have taken you for granted and will continue to do so for four years.  Chris Daggett is a smart, optimistic man who has potential to deliver for you, the voters of NJ.  He has been endorsed by the Sierra Club, he has a plan to reduce property taxes and he knows that if you don’t like him as governor, he can be thrown out in four years.  The other two candidates are going to walk all over you.  What are YOU going to do about it?

Well, I know what I’m going to do.  I’m throwing Chris Christie and Jon Corzine on the Naughty Spot for four years and I’m voting for Daggett.  Go forth, NJ, and do likewise.

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Daggett wins second debate for NJ Governor

Daggett's Sea of Green

Daggett's Sea of Green

I got a call the other day from the Daggett campaign, the independent candidate for governor of New Jersey, to meet for a rally before the second and last debate in the race.  The debate was yesterday at William Paterson University in Totowa NJ.  All of the usual suspects were there.  Corzine’s crew brought in a lot of union guys.  The Republicans had their anti-choice crowd.  There were a surprising number of conspiracy theorists who turned out to protest childhood vaccinations and specifically the H1N1 vaccine.  Don’t even get me started.

And then there was the Daggett campaign.  We had about as many ralliers as the other two campaigns and some nifty bright green signs and T-shirts.  Green sort of speaks to Daggett’s environmental creds. He’s been endorsed by the Sierra Club. By the way, Daggett’s campaign staff is drop dead gorgeous.  His rally coordinator is so hot you could bake cookies on him.  One of his staff, a tall beautiful blonde, was wearing a very fashionable sweater minidress that showcased the most amazingly long, perfect legs.  Just before the debate started, she strutted across the loge, like Joan Holloway on a mission, right in front of a bunch of Corzine supporters.  Their jaws dropped and every pair of eyes, mine included, followed her shapely gams right up to her callipygian butt.  Well done!  You can be smart and smokin’ hot.  Too bad you missed it, myiq.

The debate was sponsored and obviously controlled by the local Fox affiliaate.  I managed to snag a ticket for the debate literally minutes before it began. (Thank you, hot cookie guy!)  I don’t know the criteria that was used to give out advanced tickets but it was clearly rigged in Chris Christie’s favor.  Like I said, there weren’t an overwhelming number of Republicans outside but, judging by the cheering and applause, Republicans inside Shea PAC outnumbered the other campaigns by about 2:1.  Bostonboomer, who liveblogged the debate last night, reported that the Fox commentators talked over Daggett’s responses and occasionally Corzine. allowing Christie to pontificate in his big beefy goodness without interruption.  As we were outside during the rally, one Republican operative approached our group and said, “How does it feel to be marginalized?”  He seemed disturbed.  We were cheerily unperturbed.  We know there are a lot of New Jerseyans who are registered ‘unaffiliated’. All they need is a good reason to vote for the third guy.  (Note to Daggett’s campaign: I know your poll position is crappy.  So, why not take a cue from Joe Lieberman’s senate campaign in 2006 and create and ad with a snappy mnemonic so that voters can find you?)

Now, onto the debate.  I was transfixed.  I’ve never been to a live debate before.  And while this wasn’t as high stakes as a presidential debate, I have to give a lot of credit to the organizers and the candidates for sticking to the rules.  There were no gotcha questions.  The Lightening Round was a chance for the candidates to reveal their personalities and turned out to be pretty funny.

In short, this should be a model for all debates going forward.  I learned a lot about all three candidates and their approach to fixing what ails New Jersey.  But it was Daggett who stole the show.  Seriously, guys, I could vote for this man for president.  He’s got that Hillary Clinton policy wonk thing down cold.  He was well prepared for most questions and for the ones where he didn’t have an immediate answer, I got the sense that his mental gears were clicking.

Daggett could have a lot of appeal to both Democrats and Republicans.  He is liberal on social issues, prudent and conservative on fiscal issues.  He emphasizes tax cuts for homeowners and corporations.  I’m a little worried by how he intends to pay for it but his idea of expanding the sales tax to items that the upper middle and upper class purchase is a step in the right direction.  In fact, he could go even further and impose a small sales tax on most consumer goods (2-4%?  It would still be lower than surrounding states).   In New Jersey, we don’t have a sales tax on food or most consumer items.  There is a restaurant tax but if you go to the grocery store, no tax on most products.  New York, by contrast, has up to a 9% tax on just about everything (See Ann’s comment for more precise details).  So, you can see why New Jersey is an attractive place to shop.  On the other hand, our property taxes are through the roof.  For example, I pay more than $500 on my little townhouse – per month.  Yep, after the ridiculous federal, social security and state income taxes are paid from my generous paycheck, reducing me to just average Jane Bagodonuts, I pay more than $500 per month on a house with no property.  Personally, I don’t mind shifting some to that tax to consumable goods.  Let the people who buy the luxury cars and high end consumables pick up the tab.  Daggett also proposes a tax on gas to pay for transportation infrastructure and mass transit.  I think this is a good idea, especially if it encourages more use of mass transit in a state as congested as New Jersey.

Where I had some issues with Daggett was his approach to health care.  His opposition to the public option is not necessarily a dealbreaker for me.  I think policy wonks are able to see permutations to solving these kinds of problems because they understand the mechanisms of government.  So, if we ended up with a German type of health care, ie private insurance but highly regulated, that would be Ok with me as long as everyone is covered, insurance companies and health care providers are held accountable with mandates  for basic policies  and public funds are used to provide subsidies for those individuals who can’t afford it.  I don’t think that’s what we’re getting with Obamacare where the mandates seem to be falling more heavily on the individual and choice of insurance company is limited.  While single payer would eliminate a lot of our administrative headaches and it works for other countries, it’s not the only answer.  There’s no reason to suppose it couldn’t work here but we can’t rule out other models that check the health care industry just as well.

Daggett also didn’t have an answer for how to fund state colleges and universities.  Well, he’s got a couple of weeks to come up with an answer.  To be fair, Corzine and Christie weren’t any better on this question.  Corzine points to state financial aid grants as a sort of bandaid on the problem. Christie got all sentimental about sending his four children to local schools but added nothing to the conversation.  Daggett at least acknowledged that there was a problem with the underlying structure of state aid to colleges and universities that needed to be addressed.  He just needs to find a funding mechanism.  Might I suggest one?  Ok, this is going to sound crazy and bring out the MADD crew but most New Jersey restaurants do not have liquor licenses.  Yep, if you want to go out to a nice, new restaurant for a special dinner, you’d better call ahead because you might have to brown bag it, and drink everything you bring with you.  There aren’t that many licenses available and most of them are bought up by big chain restaurants and, I suspect, the mafia.  If you go to New York or Pennsylvania, this is never an issue.  You can get a nice glass of chard just about anywhere.  So, sell more liquor licenses, license grocery stores to sell wine and beer and watch the revenue flow in.  This leftover from Prohibition is only benefitting organized crime.

The dynamics of the debate were also pretty interesting to watch.  After Daggett’s responses to questions, Corzine frequently agreed with him in response but never once referred to him by name.  Corzine continued to frame the debate as between two party representatives, him and Chris Christie.  I think that might have worked in any other year when there wasn’t such a strong, articulate, engaging third party candidate.  I’m not sure it will work this year.  In Daggett’s closing statement, he makes a point of reminding the audience that in spite of what Corzine and Christie’s wishful thinking, there *is* a choice this year.  There is a third party candidate who offers something new, different and positive.

Go, Daggett, GO!

PS:  This race is phenomenally expensive and Daggett has chosen to run on public funds.  Corzine has spent $20 million on ads attacking Chris Christie’s waistline.  Daggett is trying to run a positive campaign on limited funds.  Just sayin’.

Note: The second debate will be televised tomorrow.  I’ll try to do another live blog because I think it is important to think outside the box, especially when there is a viable third party candidate like Daggett.  These people need more attention and support to give voters more choices and keep the other parties on their toes.

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NJ’s largest paper endorses Chris Daggett for Governor and rejects the two party system

Chris Daggett, Independent Candidate for NJ Governor

Chris Daggett, Independent Candidate for NJ Governor

Man-o-man, I should’ve been paying closer attention.  Guys, this is the Big Kahuna.  The Star-Ledger, one of New Jersey’s largest papers, has endorsed Independent Chris Daggett for governor.  The reasons for this endorsement are spectacular.  Let’s have a read:

The Star-Ledger today endorses independent candidate Chris Daggett and recommends his election as the next governor of New Jersey.

The newspaper’s decision is less a rejection of Gov. Jon Corzine and Republican Chris Christie than a repudiation of the parties they represent, both of which have forfeited any claim to the trust and confidence of the people of New Jersey. They share responsibility for the state’s current plight.

Only by breaking the hold of the Democratic and Republican mandarins on the governor’s office and putting a rein on their power will the state have any hope for the kind of change needed to halt its downward economic, political and ethical spiral.

New Jersey needs radical change in Trenton. Neither of the major parties is likely to provide it. Daggett’s election would send shock waves through New Jersey’s ossified political system and, we believe, provide a start in a new direction.

It would signal the entrenched leadership of both parties — and the interest groups they regularly represent — that an ill-served and angry electorate demands something better.

The lamentable fact is that the two parties are, themselves, little more than narrow special interests. Their competition for short-term political and/or monetary gain has jeopardized the state’s long-term economic health and left it with a tarnished national reputation.

For disappointed Democrats and Republicans, a decision to vote for Daggett will mean a break with party loyalty — no easy thing. What we’re suggesting is a temporary suspension of that loyalty as a way to begin changing the corrosive culture of Trenton. Daggett would owe nothing to either party establishment; he’d be free to recruit best talent wherever he found it. As he told The Star-Ledger editorial board, he’d feel no obligation to honor the traditional Democratic-Republican deal that requires bipartisan balance on the Supreme Court. He’d apparently take the best he could find regardless of party affiliation — or lack thereof.

Just go read the whole thing.  This is potentially a shot heard round the country.  Daggett is still polling behind Jon “I’m awarding all of Hillary’s delegates to Obama” Corzine and Chris Christie.  But in recent weeks, he’s gone from nowhere to capturing almost 20% of the vote.  It wouldn’t be the first time a state has elected an Independent for Governor, think Jesse Ventura in Minnesota.  But New Jersey is huge compared Minnesota.  There’s still several weeks left for Daggett to make up ground.  I’ve seen Daggett/Esposito signs on my way to work and I understand that his performance at the first debate was really good.

I do worry about Daggett’s intention of taking on the unions, especially the teacher’s union.  But having served on a NJ Board of Ed, I also understand that the union wields a big stick but doesn’t always deliver results.  Lifetime tenure is granted to teachers in my district after 3 years with little or no expectation that they will acquire new skills or expertise for a changing global marketplace.  It does concern me when Daggett pledges to take on the pensions of public servants.   We also need to demand more of NJ’s wealthiest  residents who like the tax system as it is- balanced on the backs of middle class homeowners.  I hope he will address this problem.  The last thing we want is to hobble the unions so much that they cease to be examples of labor strength.  Daggett needs to find a happy medium.

As the Star-Ledger says, here’s the way to take back your government.  What our current crop of politicians need right now is discipline and for the voters to hold them accountable for their bad behavior.  With the election of people like Daggett, we are capable of issuing the parties a warning.  Shape up or it’s four years on the Naughty Step.  And then we keep putting them back on that step until they get the message and do what we tell them to do.  All we lack is the courage and determination to carry through on our warnings.

If we end up with better politicians in the meantime, so much the better.

If you want to help send shockwaves around NJ and the rest of the country, you can contribute to Daggett’s campaign here. The next debate for Governor will be October 16 and will be broadcast on October 18.

Oh, and one more thing for our NJ readers out there.  Jon Corzine and the Democratic party has absolutely no respect for you as a voter.  Don’t forget that Hillary Clinton won our state by 10 points but didn’t get a single delegate from our state at the 2008 Democratic Party Convention in Denver.  Instead, Jon Corzine handed all of our votes, every last one of them, over to Barack Obama.  They didn’t listen to us last year.  That’s why they aren’t listening to us this year.  Corzine is sadly mistaken if he thought we would ever forget the disgraceful behavior of our superdelegates at the Convention.  If you want your vote to actually mean something again, start by throwing this guy out of office:

NJ has a place to go! Chris Daggett airs his first campaign ad

If you’ve been following this blog for the past couple of months, you should know that Democrat Jon Corzine, the incumbent, is trailing Republican Chris Christie for Governor of New Jersey.  Christie’s lead over Corzine has dwindled in the past week.  He now has about 6 points over Corzine.  But the curious thing is the actual poll numbers.  Christie is at about 47%, Corzine is at 41%.  So, what accounts for the missing 12%?  Undecideds account for some of that missing 12%.  And then, there are some newly unaffiliated voters, such as myself, who are taking a hard look at THIS guy:

Independent candidate, Chris Daggett got his PhD in education but he’s been working for and with both Republicans, like former governor Thomas Kean, and with Democratic administrations in NJ on environmental issues for many years.  He recently received an endorsement from the Sierra Club and his stance on social issues puts him in the moderate to liberal camp.   He has some daring ideas on education and has about as good a chance as either of the other two candidates in reforming the property tax issue. He may be a relative unknown now but Daggett has a slot at the candidate’s debate in early October and from what I understand, he can think and speak in coherent sentences.

The property tax issue is what is dragging down Jon Corzine.  This ad depicts Corzine’s attitude perfectly.  He is detached and uninterested in the crushing tax burden that most homeowners face, including yours truly.  In his first term as governor, he did diddly squat to reform the state’s funding mechanism.  Christie is a Bush Republican.  ‘Nuff said.  Neither one of them is a prize.

Jane Hamsher and her readers should take note.  What we have here is a “teachable moment”.  Remember Lamont, Jane?  I do.  I answered your call and canvassed for him in CT on the weekend before the primary.  We changed the narrative in 2006. This is an opportunity to scare the bejeesus out of the Democratic party.  You know, the one that told us we had no place else to go?  This election is a referendum on Obama, so saith Bloomberg.   And THIS year, I do have someplace else to go.

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NJ Governor’s race is a referendum on Obama

Taffeta, darling.  It wrinkles so easily.

"Taffeta, darling. It wrinkles so easily."

I’ve been a little quiet lately, mostly because just about all I needed to say about Obama and what a disaster he was going to be to the party was said last year.  It’s nice to see that the rest of the blogosphere is finally coming to the same place that the PUMAs were in back in 2008.  (See here and here)  We’re all old, postmenopausal, uneducated, working class racists now, even Kos.  Welcome to the club, buddy!  We’ll put your white sheet and estrogen replacement therapy starter pack in the mail.

But the scorched earth Obama primary campaign of 2008 continues to have collateral damage in other not so obvious ways.  Take the governor’s race in NJ, for example.  Jon Corzine is still trailing Chris Christie, in some polls by 10% or more.  Bloomberg now says that this off-year election race is a referendum on the Obama presidency:

The elections offer a test of whether the electricity Obama generated with voters during his campaign will power other Democrats.

Obama has been campaigning for both Governor Jon Corzine, 62, of New Jersey and Creigh Deeds, 51, a state senator running for governor in Virginia. The president’s push for health-care legislation and unprecedented federal spending on the worst financial crisis in 70 years has created headaches for his fellow Democrats, who both trail their opponents in the polls.

“The political bounce on everything that’s happened this summer has made people much more cautious, much more conservative and fearful of change,” said Ross Baker, a professor of political science at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Support for Obama and his policies has eroded over the summer. The percentage of Americans who disapprove of his handling of health care has jumped to 50 percent from 29 percent in April, an ABC News/Washington Post poll conducted Aug. 13 to 17 found.

There’s a reason why support for Obama and his policies have eroded over the summer.  He didn’t start out of the gate with the hope and change he promised, didn’t protect taxpayers from the bankers and didn’t present a strong health care policy that takes the profit out of insuring people’s health.  He didn’t do those things because he’s never really been much of a Democrat, much less a liberal one.  He has no core Democratic principles, something Jane Hamsher, Chris Bowers and Markos Moulitsas didn’t think was so important last year.  Well, that was before they became racists.

The problem is that a little more than half of the Democratic base didn’t vote for Obama in the primaries last year.  They voted for the other guy.  After 8 years of Bush, patiently waiting for 8 F&*%ing years, they wanted the most Democratic president they could get.  But the party shoved Obama down our throats instead in a frenzy of money lust and as a teachable moment on race.  (as if teachable moments on gender were not very important, but I digress.)

This is the situation we have in NJ as well, where we voted for Clinton by more than 10 points but saw Corzine give every one od our delegates to Obama at the convention.  You know, if I were Corzine, I’d be regretting that decision right about now because he’s been trailing Christie by about 10% all election season.  Primary voters usually are party loyalists.  Messing with them was a really baaaad idea. It doesn’t help that, like Obama, Corzine really isn’t much of a Democrat.  In spite of the fact that the state Assembly is in Democratic hands, he has done nothing about restructuring the tax system here in NJ, which funds EVERYTHING on the backs of homeowners.  You redstaters out there who think you have it bad with taxes should see the tax bill I have on my modest little townhouse.  Corzine didn’t take that issue seriously, just like Obama isn’t taking health care seriously or the financial crisis seriously or Afghanistan seriously.

If you’re going to act like a Republican anyway, as well as being permanently associated with Goldman Sachs, does it matter if we vote for you?  There are choices, by the way.  We don’t have to vote for Chris Christie.  I know Corzine would like everyone to believe that Christie is his only competition.  Corzine even tried to move the debate from the beginning of October to the end  so no one would know there was a third candidate.   Corzine can’t afford to lose any more ground to any other candidate.

The Star-Ledger says Daggett speaks in coherent sentences!

The Star-Ledger says Daggett speaks in coherent sentences!

But Independent Chris Daggett, who’s going to be at that debate,  just got an endorsement from the Sierra Club so I’m taking a second look at him.  Plus, he’s got some ideas about education and lifetime tenure of new teachers that I find interesting, especially since this has the potential of improving the preparation of teachers in NJ schools in the area of Math and Science. Daggett could pick up a lot of support in the growing Asian community if he emphasized a math and science component of his education plan.  And those of you who have had enough of Bush’s and now Obama’s rambling speeches and non-sequitors will appreciate this comment from our local Star-Ledger:

Daggett stands to be the most articulate of the three as well. Christie piles on the platitudes like a pie-man piles on the pizza toppings. Corzine tends to get lost in the funhouse of his own thoughts. Daggett speaks in coherent sentences….So this race promises to be a real roller-coaster ride. Fasten your seat belt.

That’s a good sign.  It means that Daggett’s at least engaged his mind before he’s opened his mouth.  He’s pretty reasonable on social issues as well.

As for Corzine, what goes around, comes around.   Maybe he can get a job in his old pal, Barack Obama’s administration, for what ever is left of his term.

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Corzine *still* trails Christie by double digits in latest NJ Governor’s race polls

The guy just can’t catch a break.  First, he’s pathetic as a Democratic governor but would probably make a very good Republican one.  Then, he happens to be a former CEO of Goldman-Sachs at a time when that company is quickly becoming the Barad-Dur of Mordor.  And he has to go up against the “moderate Republican” in the fall instead of the foaming-at-the-mouth, uber conservative Republican he was hoping for.  But the thing that must be frosting his crockies right now is that he is trailing that moderate Republican, former US Attorney Chris Christie, by 10 points (on average).

(For those of you who want your fix of schadenfreude this morning, here is another page of polls where Corzine trails- in every one.)

I can’t imagine why 10% of his base would be defecting to a Republican this year…

Could it be the 10% of New Jerseyans who put Hillary over the top in the NJ primary last year who resent Corzine’s arrogant, unilateral decision to give every one of our primary delegates to Obama?  Just a guess.

But it’s about to get worse for Corzine {{smirk!}}.  Because the Independent Party candidate, Chris Daggett, just qualified for public financing.  Daggett is expected to make the race tough for both major party candidates but even tougher for Corzine.  I can’t imagine why.

I was going to vote topless this year at the polls in NJ but that’s because I didn’t think there were any viable third party candidates.

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Chris Daggett

Chris Daggett

Granted, I don’t know much about Daggett yet (here’s a blogtalkradio interview with him) but, heck!, he can’t be any worse than a Republican or the Republican who pretends he’s a Democrat.  He’s spent time in the government working in the area of environmental regulation and he’s a big proponent of mass transit, definitely a plus in my books.  So, I’ve decided to throw a few bucks Daggett’s way and see what happens.  Every $1 contributed to Daggett will be matched by $2 in public funds.  Maybe if we pass this around, we can make Corzine sweat or we might even elect an Independent as governor here in the Garden State.  Daggett in Drumthwacket!  It has a nice ring.

Now, Corzine isn’t worried, or so his campaign manager says.  Maggie Moran sent me a video haka yesterday about Obama’s upcoming trip to NJ on Corzine’s behalf.

Obama owes Corzine.  Big time.  (see first youtube video above)  Apparently, SOOOO many people asked for tickets to the Obama rally that they have had to reject a whole bunch of us.  The campaign will be contacting “lucky” rally ticket recipients by phone.  And the rally itself has been moved to a more secure location in Holmdel.  Ahuh.  Well, I’m sure it has nothing to do with the angry email responses the campaign has gotten from its base saying things like “Where’s my vote, JON?!?!” And I’m sure there will be no loyalty oath required to get a ticket.  Actually, I’m surprised I’m still on the email list.  But who knows?  Maybe Corzine will get the crowd he’s hoping for.  Or maybe he’ll get the one he deserves.  Stay tuned…

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